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Todd M Dewey, MD

Cardio-Thoracic Surgery

Provider Rating

4.8

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378 reviews

Visit Preparation: 4.8
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Patient Recomm...: 4.8
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Provider Explan...: 3.9
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Office Wait Time: 4.1
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Southwest Cardiothoracic Surgeons

7777 Forest Ln, Suite A307
Dallas, TX 75230

About Todd M Dewey

Dr. Todd Dewey specializes in the treatment of valvular related heart disease, cardiac transplantation, mechanical assist devices, and complex coronary artery disease. He is the surgical director of both structural heart disease and cardiac transplantation at Medical City Dallas Hospital. Additionally, he serves as chief of the section of thoracic surgery at Medical City. Dr. Dewey is a member of Southwest Cardiothoracic Surgeons whose practice philosophy is to deliver compassionate world-class care to patients by providing access to innovative therapies and state of the art techniques.

As a pioneer in the field of aortic valve replacement using a catheter-based system that does not require use of the heart lung machine, stopping the heart or opening the chest, Dr. Dewey has the distinction of performing the first transapical aortic valve replacement utilizing this breakthrough technology in the United States. He is recognized as one of the most experienced surgeons in the world with this technique. Internationally known as a leader in the field of valvular heart disease, he has trained surgeons in Europe, Canada, Australia, and the United States in both catheter based aortic valve replacement as well as minimally invasive surgical techniques.

Dr. Dewey is a 1985 graduate of Baylor University and received his medical degree from Texas Tech Health Science Center School of Medicine. He did his general surgery residency in Dallas at UT Southwestern School of Medicine and Parkland Memorial Hospital. He then completed his cardiothoracic surgery training at The New York Hospital / Cornell Medical Center in New York City. After finishing the Cornell program, he did further training in cardiac transplantation and mechanical assist devices with Dr. Mehmet Oz at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Prior to returning to Texas, he served as cardiothoracic surgical faculty at Columbia.

Named one of D Magazine's Best Doctors

Honored by D Magazine as one of Dallas’s best doctors for the 9th year, he is also the recipient of the Young Investigators award from the International Society of Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery, and maintains a leadership position within the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Dr. Dewey is an active member of numerous professional organizations including, the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association, the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation, the 21st Century Cardiac Surgery Club, and the Parkland Surgical Society. The author of more than 60 peer-reviewed articles and multiple textbook chapters covering the areas of off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, valve surgery and left ventricular assist device implantation for end-stage heart disease, Dr. Dewey is a noted lecturer both nationally and internationally.

Aortic Valve Replacement Expert – A Q&A With Dr. Dewey

The aortic valve is one of the four valves of the heart. There are two valves that separate the up- per and lower chambers of the heart—the mitral and tricuspid valve—and two valves that sepa- rate the heart from the rest of the body—the aor- tic and the pulmonary valves. The aortic valve normally has three leaflets, although one to two percent of the population is born with only two leaflets. A normally functioning aortic valve opens easily and does not let blood leak back into the heart when it closes.
Aortic stenosis is the most common problem with the aortic valve, and the most common reason for valve-related heart surgery. Stenosis, or narrowing, of the valve, occurs when calci- um builds up on the valve and limits its ability to open when the heart contracts. The normal opening of the aortic valve is roughly the size of a half-dollar; severely narrowed valves have an opening the size of a dime. Approximately two percent of people older than 65, three percent of people 75 and older, and four percent of people older than 85 have aortic valve stenosis. The prevalence is increasing with the aging population in North America and Europe.
Initial symptoms are mild fatigue or shortness of breath with exertion. As the stenosis progresses and worsens, patients may develop fainting with rapid standing, lower extremity edema, chest pain, shortness of breath at rest, and ultimately death unless treated.
Typically aortic stenosis is treated with open- heart surgery to completely replace the narrowed valve. The most common type of valves used to replace abnormal aortic valves are either bovine or porcine in origin. These types of valves do not require the use of blood thinners. In centers with extensive experience in aortic valve surgery, most patients are treated with a minimally invasive approach that decreases patient discomfort and promotes early return to activity.

Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is being performed at the leading cardiac surgical centers around the world. This new technique does not require opening the chest, stopping the heart, or using the heart-lung machine to replace the aortic valve. The valve can be inserted through either an artery in the leg or a small incision between the ribs. This new valve is currently FDA approved for use in patients too old or sick for conventional surgery and likely to receive FDA approval in the near future for higher-risk patients with critical aortic stenosis.

Transapical Aortic Valve for implantation

Physician's Assistant prepping for surgery

As a pioneer in the field of aortic valve replacement using a catheter-based system that does not require use of the heart lung machine, stopping the heart, or opening the chest, Dr. Dewey has the distinction of performing the first transapical aortic valve replacement utilizing this breakthrough technology in the United States. He is recognized as one of the most experienced surgeons in the world with this technique. Internationally known as a leader in the field of valvular heart disease, he has trained surgeons in Europe, Canada, Australia, and the United States in both catheter-based aortic valve replacement as well as minimally invasive surgical techniques.

Dr. Todd Dewey is a member and active researcher at the Cardiopulmonary Research and Technology Institute (CRSTI) located at Medical City Dallas Hospital.

CRSTI is dedicated to turning tomorrow's medical science into today's treatments and cures, ensuring that the highest quality of care is available to the community. CRSTI has accomplished remarkable strides in its effort to develop and promote state-of-the-art therapies and techniques on behalf of those affected by heart and lung disease. crsti.org

Education

Medical School
Texas Tech Health Science Center School of Medicine

Residency
UT Southwestern School of Medicine and Parkland Memorial Hospital, General Surgery - Dallas, TX

Certifications & Memberships

Cardiothoracic Surgeon

Gender

Male

Languages Spoken

English

Specialty

Cardio-Thoracic Surgery

Office Locations

Southwest Cardiothoracic Surgeons
7777 Forest Ln
Suite A307
Dallas, TX 75230
Phone: (972) 566-4866
Fax: (972) 566-2469

Office Hours

Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 5:00pm

Additional Locations

Southwest Cardiothoracic Surgeons (Plano)

1600 Coit Road, Suite 303
Plano, TX 75075